Navigation

Illegal: A graphic novel telling one boy

Author: Eoin Colfer
Pub Date: 12/07/2018
This is a powerful and timely story about one boy's epic journey across Africa to Europe, a graphic novel for all children with glorious colour artwork throughout. From Eoin Colfer, previously Irish Children's Laureate, ...
ISBN: 9781444931686
Availability: Out of Stock

£10.99



Product description
This is a powerful and timely story about one boy's epic journey across Africa to Europe, a graphic novel for all children with glorious colour artwork throughout. From Eoin Colfer, previously Irish Children's Laureate, and the team behind his bestselling Artemis Fowl graphic novels. Ebo: alone. His sister left months ago. Now his brother has disappeared too, and Ebo knows it can only be to make the hazardous journey to Europe. Ebo's epic journey takes him across the Sahara Desert to the dangerous streets of Tripoli, and finally out to the merciless sea. But with every step he holds on to his hope for a new life, and a reunion with his sister. *Winner of the Judges' Special Award at the Children's Books Ireland Book of the Year Awards* 'Beautifully realised and punchily told.' Alex O'Connell, The Times Children's Book of the Week 'A powerful, compelling work, evocatively illustrated ... It would take a hard heart not to be moved by this book.' Financial Times
Related Books
Customers who bought this item also bought

Boy Giant: Son of Gulliver

£12.99
A stunning new story of hope, humanity and high-seas adventure for children and adults everywhere from Sir Michael Morpurgo, the nation's favourite storyteller and multi-million copy bestselling author of WAR HORSE.

Quaker Quicks - Practical Mystics: Quake

£6.99
Are Quakers mystics? What does that mean? How does it translate into how we are and what we do in the world?

Quaker Quicks - Why I am a Pacifist: A c

£6.99
Tim Gee tells the story of why he became a pacifist and what it means to him. Gee reflects on the lives of peacemakers past and present to provide responses to questions like "Don't we have to hit back if we're hurt?", "Don't we need war to respond t