Navigation

Indefensible: Seven Myths That Sustain the Global Arms Trade

Author: Paul Holden
Pub Date: 15/02/2017
Publisher: Zed Books Ltd
Although there is often opposition to individual wars, most people continue to believe that the arms industry is necessary in some form: to safeguard our security, provide jobs and stimulate the economy. Not only conservatives, but many progressives
ISBN: 11895
Availability: Out of Stock

£9.99



Product description
Although there is often opposition to individual wars, most people continue to believe that the arms industry is necessary in some form: to safeguard our security, provide jobs and stimulate the economy. Not only conservatives, but many progressives and liberals, support it for these reasons. Indefensible puts forward a devastating challenge to this conventional wisdom, which has normalised the existence of the most savage weapons of mass destruction ever known. It is the essential handbook for those who want to debunk the arguments of the industry and its supporters: deploying case studies, statistics and irrefutable evidence to demonstrate they are fundamentally flawed, both factually and logically. Far from protecting us, the book shows how the arms trade undermines our security by fanning the flames of war, terrorism and global instability. In countering these myths, the book points to ways in which we can combat the arms trade's malignant influence, reclaim our democracies and reshape our economies.
Related Books
Customers who bought this item also bought

Connecting to change the world

£22.99
Easily understandable and full of actionable advice, Connecting to Change the World is an informative guide to creating collaborative solutions to tackle the most difficult challenges society faces.

Faith power and peace

£6.00
Swarthmore Lecture 2015. To say 'yes' to peace we must say a final 'no' to war and join together, heart and soul, in the task of creating peace by peaceful means, speaking with one authentic and passionate voice.

Down With The Royals

£10.00
When Prince George was just eight weeks old, the Evening Standard declared him to be 'the most influential person in London'.